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The correct way to repair a broken chair stretcher

I see a lot of bad repair jobs come through my shop and most of the time, the furniture is here to have the repair repaired! I thought I’d publish an article on correctly performing a very common repair on a typical chair – a broken stretcher. I’ve seen repairs using everything from sheetrock screws to duct tape and everything in between but instead of reaching for the Gorilla glue(this stuff doesn’t belong on the list of things that exist on our planet), you may as well fix it in a lasting way.

It’s difficult to say what the hardest part of this repair is.  Some shops would argue it’s in the shaping of the new wood, while others might contend that matching the color and finish of the new wood to the old is where they struggle.  As for me, I don’t break it down that way.  This whole process to me, is pure fun.  I love matching things and trying to make it look like it never happened – it’s a challenge every time, but always entertaining.

Lets move on and I’ll show you exactly what happens when you bring a poor little chair with a broken stretcher to Lauer Furniture Restoration.  It’s worth mentioning that this repair method applies to more than just a broken stretcher – this technique is the correct way to repair many furniture breaks including chair back spindles and legs, table legs and more. It’s a solid method and properly executed, it’s literally as strong as it was new.

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Front bottom stretcher is broken off clean at both ends.

 

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